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  1. Read a ‘Good Nutrition’ book. Check out this list of books, located on the Academy for Nutrition and Dietetics’ website, that provide accurate, scientific nutrition information. The list of books is organized in categories, including Child and Teen Nutrition, Diabetes, Sports Nutrition, and more!
  2. Try a new recipe that incorporates nutrient-rich foods. Nutrient-rich foods provide the most nutrients per calorie—fruit, vegetables, low-fat or non-fat dairy, and lean protein are all nutrient-rich foods. They are jammed packed with flavor and provide color to your meals. Prepare one of these nutrient-rich recipes for dinner tonight.
  3. Hold a taste test with your friends or family. Ever wonder what jicama is and what it tastes like? Stop by the grocery and pick up a food that you have never tried before and conduct a taste test with your friends or family. For even more fun, provide dipping sauces, like yogurt or ranch, during your taste test. Who knows, maybe you will find a new favorite snack!
  4. Go for an after-meal walk. National Nutrition Month® also promotes physical activity, so slip on your walking shoes and invite your co-workers or family on a post-meal walk. It’s a great way to get your heart pumping and burn some calories. At our office, a couple of us have been braving the cold temperatures and walking around our building after lunch.
  5. Set time aside to enjoy a family meal at the dinner table. Between work, practice, errands and everything else that your day consist of, sometimes it is hard to find time for a family meal. So take some time to sit down with your family or friends and enjoy a meal filled with great conversation and good food this month.
  6. Keep a food journal. Want to make sure you are filling your plate with each food group? Compare your meal to MyPlate to see if all of the food groups are represented at most of your meals.
  7. Check out the nutrition facts label. Find out exactly how many nutrients are in your favorite foods. Make sure to pay close attention to the serving size, since most of the nutrient amounts are based on one serving size instead of the whole package.